Snag that Remote Job! 5 Tips to Acing Your Virtual Interview

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Justine Shu / May 28, 2019

Congratulations on landing an interview for your next remote job!

Whether this is your first virtual interview or your 10th, here are some tips to help you level up and score the remote job of your dreams.

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Pre-interview

“Opportunity does not waste time with those who are unprepared.” ― Idowu Koyenikan, Wealth for All: Living a Life of Success at the Edge of Your Ability

1. Prep Your Interview Space in a Distraction-free Zone

Checklist

  • Is your TV off? (even if it’s in a separate room)
  • Are all notifications turned off? Set your phone and computer on DND or mute the sound.
  • How’s your WiFi connection? Close all programs that could slow your connection down–do this ahead of time.
  • How's the framing of your camera? Set up the aesthetic in advance:
    • Ensure the room you’re in is well-lit.
    • Pick your background. A neutral coloured wall free of clutter is less distracting for everyone.
    • Prop your monitor or laptop up on a stand or stack of books so that the camera is set at eye level.
  • Do you have your questions and notes ready? Have a notebook or loose leaf and pen handy to jot down points or questions that arise during the interview.
  • Have you logged in to the assigned interviewing platform ahead of time to avoid potential delays?

2. Practice Makes Progress

Recording yourself while answering some common interview questions is a solid way to improve your video presentation. Better yet, record a practice round with a friend interviewing you via Zoom. This may sound terrifying, but awareness is key here! Remember these tips below, but above all else, don’t forget to be your authentic self.

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Checklist

Observe your non-verbal cues:

  • Are you looking at the camera while speaking? Great!
  • What does your face look like while the other person is speaking?
  • What does your body language look like? Are your shoulders tensed up or are you over-using hand gestures? Are you sitting straight up or slouched over?

Observe your speech quality:

  • Do you need to speak louder or slower?
  • How clearly are you speaking?

Interview

“Focus on opportunities, not setbacks. Focus on what you can do, not what you can’t. Focus on the present moment, not the past or the future. Empower yourself!”
― Akiroq Brost

3. Interview back

Interviews allow both parties to get to know each other better and should be treated as a two-way conversation. Think about what you value in a job and inquire further. Here are a few questions to get you started:

  • How would you describe the company culture in your words?
  • Your website mentions that the company supports work/life balance. Can you provide some examples?
  • How do the managers/team leaders encourage collaboration and connection in this particular remote environment?

While listening, write down high-level points or questions in case you forget anything.

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4. Be Explicit

When interviewing in-person, the interviewer can generally get a sense or feel for your “vibe” and personality. While certain attributes can still be translated through video, explicitly stating your thoughts and feelings can make it easier for the interviewer to get a better read of you. You don’t have to go overboard, but if it feels true and authentic, communicating something such as, “I’m very excited to hear that [company name] invests in benefits that support both personal and career growth.” Sharing those kinds of sentiments with a smile and enthusiastic nod can help the interviewer get a better understanding of who you are and what you value.

Post-Interview

“Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished.”
– Lao Tzu

5. Follow Up

Just like any other interview, follow up within 24 hours. Send them an email thanking them for their time. Include any follow-up questions and/or important points you wanted to expand on while keeping it short and concise. If you didn’t get a timeframe in the interview and forgot to ask, now would be a great time to do so.

If you haven’t heard back within a week and a half since the date they mentioned, send a short follow up email.

We’re sending you well wishes during this exciting time in your life! The waiting game while searching for the perfect remote job sure can be difficult, but relying on your support system and focusing on other activities can help alleviate any anxiety that may arise. Best of luck!